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Can anyone translate this for me please?
#21
(03-17-2019, 04:07 PM)Baruch wrote: No matter how it's worded it makes no sense to me.

Impossibility is nothing - Impossible is nothing - Nothing is impossible

All 3 versions are incorrect. There are so many things that are absolutely impossible.

In the end I did learn one lesson.

" The ability to speak in several languages is an asset. But the ability to keep your mouth closed in any language is priceless. "

Nice quote!   Too me, it makes no sense either. My chiming in was to think on how the correct Hebrew might be used. Wrestling with the meaning would only make my head hurt.
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#22
(03-17-2019, 06:10 PM)Dana wrote:
(03-17-2019, 04:07 PM)Baruch wrote: No matter how it's worded it makes no sense to me.

Impossibility is nothing - Impossible is nothing - Nothing is impossible

All 3 versions are incorrect. There are so many things that are absolutely impossible.

In the end I did learn one lesson.

" The ability to speak in several languages is an asset. But the ability to keep your mouth closed in any language is priceless. "

Nice quote!   Too me, it makes no sense either. My chiming in was to think on how the correct Hebrew might be used. Wrestling with the meaning would only make my head hurt.

I agree that "Impossible Is Nothing" doesn't make a lot of sense to me, either -- but that's the advertising business for you.  It only has to stick in people's minds, and sell stuff.

I'm really curious, though, as to how Adidas Israel might have translated it.  So, here's my request for Jason again (as it got buried on the previous page):

Channalee wrote:I have an idea as to how we can get a correct Hebrew translation of "Impossible Is Nothing."
 
We first have to track down the origin of the quote, which has already been done for us by Quote Investigator:
 
https://quoteinvestigator.com/2017/11/28/impossible-is/
 
Acknowledging that this is a marketing slogan from Adidas that had been falsely attributed to the late, great American boxer, Muhammad Ali, we next have to track down the Hebrew version of this Adidas slogan.  Which should not be too difficult for someone living in Israel (*waves to Jason*), as Adidas is marketed in Israel by Adidas Israel, a subsidiary of Adidas Worldwide. 
 
So, someone in Israel (*waves to Jason!*) can maybe contact Adidas Israel by phone and ask about their slogan?
Heart !לחיים

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#23
(03-17-2019, 04:54 PM)Channalee wrote: I have an idea as to how we can get a correct Hebrew translation of "Impossible Is Nothing."
 
We first have to track down the origin of the quote, which has already been done for us by Quote Investigator:
 
https://quoteinvestigator.com/2017/11/28/impossible-is/
 
Acknowledging that this is a marketing slogan from Adidas that had been falsely attributed to the late, great American boxer, Muhammad Ali, we next have to track down the Hebrew version of this Adidas slogan.  Which should not be too difficult for someone living in Israel (*waves to Jason*), as Adidas is marketed in Israel by Adidas Israel, a subsidiary of Adidas Worldwide. 
 
So, someone in Israel (*waves to Jason!*) can maybe contact Adidas Israel by phone and ask about their slogan?

Normally, slogans in marketing change to match the culture to which the advertising is aimed. I doubt that "Impossible is Nothing" would be an advertising slogan in Israel. It just doesn't make sense.

McDonald's has the slogan "I'm lovin' it" in America. In Israel, I've never seen that. In fact, I brought it up one time when I was teaching English, because "I'm loving it" is unusual in proper English. I brought it up with the caveat that it specifically means "I'm really enjoying eating this." It doesn't mean the same thing as "I love McDonald's" or "I love eating at McDonald's (generally)."

Whereas "I'm lovin' it" pops up in the songs at the end of television slots for their commercials, it isn't part of their promotions as it is in the USA.

That said, without calling Adidas, I don't think it would make sense for them to advertise with a slogan like this.
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#24
(03-17-2019, 02:16 PM)Dana wrote: @Jason,  Any chance this makes sense?  An em-dash maybe?    "Impossibility is nothing."   אִי אֶפְשָׁרוּת —כּלוּם

While אֶפְשָׁרוּת means "possibility," it's used to mean "choice," as in יֵש לָנוּ שְׁתֵּי אֶפְשָׁרֻיּוֹת "We have two options / choices / possibilities." It doesn't mean "possibility" as a an independent abstract. I've never heard it with the negating prefix אִי־. I may have written אי אפשרי before, but now that I think about this, even that is wrong.

With the term אפשר, we can have the prefix אי to get אי אפשר. However, when it's particularly an adjective, we have the form with the בלתי prefix, so that it becomes בִּלְתִּי אֶפְשָׁרִי "impossible."

Perhaps we could word the idea as אֵין דָּבָר בִּלְתִּי אֶפְשָׁרִי "there is nothing impossible." This would certainly be grammatically and conceptually acceptable in Hebrew.
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#25
Hi there,

i come from jewish descendants and I'm having a necklace made with my daughters name in hebrew script, i understand their are different types of fonts, but i really wanted it translated it properly. Just wondering if any could translate both:

Jayeanne

Jayeanne Yardéna

into hebrew script with possibly different fonts and explain them please.

Thank you so much,
Maria
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#26
(03-16-2019, 05:38 PM)Channalee wrote: I would have resorted to Google Translate, except the last time I used Google Translate, I got this:
 
[Image: ZxdFASG.jpg?1]
Lesson learned:  Don't use Google Translate.

One way to use Google translate is to carry out an (admittedly rudimentary) accuracy check, as follows:
Take the resulting translation and have Google Translate translate it back into English. 
Does it make sense when translated back? This gives you an idea of the accuracy.

Once I needed to rebut Palestinian Arab propaganda into an answer that needed to be in French. 
By carrying out the above form of checking I could see that the translation as it stood did not make sense. I kept changing the original English wording so that after a few attempts, when the French translation was translated back into English, it made sense. 

I never got criticism from French readers of the translated text when I carried out that form of checking, but I did get criticism from the French readers if I did not carry out that checking!
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