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Judaism: Working on the Sabbath
#1
According to Jewish law can a Jew operate a computer on the Sabbath?

Thanks.
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#2
No, one does not use electrical devices on shabbat. So that eliminates computers and cell phones.
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#3
(04-29-2019, 02:41 PM)Chavak wrote: No, one does not use electrical devices on shabbat. So that eliminates computers and cell phones.

Thank you.
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#4
(04-29-2019, 07:39 PM)George wrote: Thank you.

Chavak has given you a Jewish perspective, but it is not the only one.

See, for example, Rabbi Daniel Nevins' massive responsum on the subject, approved by the Conservative movement's Committee on Jewish Law and Standards.

I don't think you yet appreciate that Judaism does not always speak with one voice.
בקש שלום ורדפהו
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#5
According to Orthodoxy, all electronic devices are considered muktseh, something not to be touched or used on Shabbat or holy days (chagim).
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#6
(04-29-2019, 11:52 PM)RabbiO wrote: I don't think you yet appreciate that Judaism does not always speak with one voice.

That's true. It's important to mention that Orthodoxy holds that electronics are off-limits on Shabbat, but other branches of Judaism have more flexible opinions regarding such things. It comes down to how one interprets the idea of electricity. Is it similar to fire, as the Orthodox understand it?

Electricity itself is not forbidden, per se, but its similarity to fire (which is forbidden) is brought forth in Orthodox responsa, and the idea of connecting family and bringing them together without distraction is a principle of Shabbat keeping in Orthodoxy. That is, people who play with their phones are distracted. As we see all the time, it's impossible to talk to a teenager who has his eyes glued to his phone. The television is the same. It is a huge distraction.

I think the principle of turning off electronics is an excellent thing to observe in a family setting. Shabbat aims to bring the family together. We have a dinner as a family. We don't use distracting devices. There are lots of great things about this principle, IMHO.

I live alone with roommates. I don't have family with me in Israel, and I end up not keeping Shabbat myself. If I had family around me, I would be far more inclined to observe Shabbat (for the sake of nachat).
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#7
Here is a link to Nevins' teshuvah - https://rabbinevins.files.wordpress.com/...ficial.pdf

If one is interested in an Orthodox perspective here is a link to piece by Rabbis Howard Jachter and Michael Broyde who are Orthodox rabbis. - http://www.daat.ac.il/daat/english/Journal/broyde_1.htm
בקש שלום ורדפהו
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#8
@Jason,
what is nachat?
Could you tell more about it, please?
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#9
(05-04-2019, 01:09 PM)Deliah wrote: @Jason,
what is nachat?
Could you tell more about it, please?

It's like rest or quietness.
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#10
ok, thanks :-)
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