The following warnings occurred:
Warning [2] Cannot modify header information - headers already sent by (output started at /home/jaihare/thehebrewcafe.com/forum/inc/languages/english/replyban.lang.php:1) - Line: 1939 - File: inc/functions.php PHP 7.3.16 (Linux)
File Line Function
[PHP]   errorHandler->error
/inc/functions.php 1939 header
/inc/functions.php 2009 my_setcookie
/inc/functions_indicators.php 41 my_set_array_cookie
/showthread.php 665 mark_thread_read
Warning [2] Cannot modify header information - headers already sent by (output started at /home/jaihare/thehebrewcafe.com/forum/inc/languages/english/replyban.lang.php:1) - Line: 1939 - File: inc/functions.php PHP 7.3.16 (Linux)
File Line Function
[PHP]   errorHandler->error
/inc/functions.php 1939 header
/inc/functions.php 2009 my_setcookie
/inc/functions_indicators.php 255 my_set_array_cookie
/inc/functions_indicators.php 47 mark_forum_read
/showthread.php 665 mark_thread_read




Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Buddhist Philosophy on Purpose & Mistakes
#1
This is a weird title and likely something not heard as much as compared to other major religions to discuss here.

I want to first post something I've heard recently from a Buddhist tale/philosophy and would like to compare/ask from a Judaic perspective.

There's two monks - the older one who is wiser and the younger one who is inexperienced and learning from the wiser monk. The older monk asks the younger one to bring the vase with water from the first table onto the second table that was closer to him. The younger one did what was asked; during the process the water inside the vase was tilting and spilling over carelessly. The older asks, "What are you doing?" The younger one said that he did what he was told by him and brought the vase over where the older one asked to bring it to. Then the older monk responds, "Yes, but you done so carelessly. What if this was your purpose in life?" 

The takeaway mainly being that even if a person does what was asked, even as far as being their purpose in life - are they doing so with care? Are they treating what they do as if it's the last thing or the last time doing so, and how would they make of it as that is the meaning of their life. 

I want to ask in similar context with Judaism - as it started with Moses in doing what Gd asks and does so in specific manners in order to keep his covenant and purpose for his chosen nation. How would one know that even if they are simply doing what is asked is being done so for the 'right' reasons, in the right way? If they are not, how can they fix what they had done carelessly so that they can continue throughout life with what ever purpose they are given to do so in the right fashion? 

I'm interested to hear from the Judaic perspective and perhaps within the text that may instruct or give a commonality on how it is instructed. Especially since, as the younger monk in the example had, done what was asked but did it in the way that was not seen as part of their purpose and with care on a higher level. The vase can represent 'a' purpose or in general perspective on how we go through about life. 

Your thoughts? I am interested to hear. Any type of resources to read or watch can be helpful. Smile
Reply
#2
CNikki,

Very good question, thank you for asking!

I'm not sure I have an authorative answer, but from what I have seen there is a concept of doing something with concentration, not just for the sake of doing it.

For example during our prayers, one is not supposed to do it in rote, but with attention, concentration and meaning.

As far as -

"How would one know that even if they are simply doing what is asked is being done so for the 'right' reasons, in the right way? If they are not, how can they fix what they had done carelessly so that they can continue throughout life with what ever purpose they are given to do so in the right fashion?"

I think there needs to be more specifics to that question/answer.

Obviously we believe the right reason to follow G-d's instructions is because He knows what is best for us, even if we don't understand the reasons why. To do it the right way may include some trial and error. Don't forget, we learn from our mistakes, or hopefully we do! Many examples can be taken from King David as not everything he did was, well let's say, "kosher". But what is important is what we do after that.

So I think we are meant to make mistakes and grow from there. King Solomon tells us in Proverbs 24 -

16 -For a righteous man can fall seven times and rise, but the wicked shall stumble upon evil.

It shows us we can still be righteous when we make mistakes, if we choose to rise/change after that.

I'm hoping some others on here will chime in with more on this!
Reply
#3
(07-23-2020, 01:17 AM)searchinmyroots wrote: So I think we are meant to make mistakes and grow from there. King Solomon tells us in Proverbs 24 -

16 -For a righteous man can fall seven times and rise, but the wicked shall stumble upon evil.

It shows us we can still be righteous when we make mistakes, if we choose to rise/change after that.

I'm hoping some others on here will chime in with more on this!


Interesting take. Funny enough that it says seven times since it's considered as 'Gd's' number, then rise again which would make it the eighth time to pick ourselves back up, if I'm understanding correctly. 

I'll have to be more specific at another time since I'm concluding the night soon enough and I'm starting to feel drowsy. But thank you for your response, I appreciate it. Smile
Reply
#4
7 times may reflect the 7 days of the week, meaning we can make mistakes everyday.

But what counts is not when we fall, but when we rise to try and not make those mistakes again.

Sorry to keep you up so late!
Reply
#5
Hello. Sorry that I have not responded as soon as I said I would. I also figured that almost everyone here was observing Shabbat and therefore would not be online.

Back to Searchinmyroots' response:

- 16 -For a righteous man can fall seven times and rise, but the wicked shall stumble upon evil.

I think this should also separate on what can classify as righteous and evil. Those who do 'evil' would start similarly as the person who's made a mistake (fell); but what boundaries are truly set if there is a righteous and wicked with the person doing the same mistakes? By that I mean, if a person is evidently falling again and may or may not see the error of their ways, would it be predetermined if they are the person who stumbles or the person who is evil? Can the evil be redeemed and come out righteous at any point?

Similarly with the purpose example - a person can go through their life and do what they deem as their calling, however ordinary. But, let's just say, they do it carelessly because they believe it as a mere chore or how they conduct themselves in the process that can in long-term harm those they are initially serving (ex; negative attitude, misleading the person(s) involved). Sort of like a person in their occupation starting with good intentions but over time they might not give their dedication and serve it in the right manner. Or maybe the person is in it and they've started it wrongly to begin with (referring to the evil).

I don't know. Maybe it's too open of an analogy or it unfolds probable subjects that can steer back to that verse on who gets to become righteous or evil. Who learns from their purpose and mistakes and who remains blind throughout the process.
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)