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Thou shalt not take the name of the Lord thy God in vain.
#1
What exactly does it mean to take the name of the Lord in vain?

Thanks.
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#2
(02-08-2021, 06:31 PM)George wrote: What exactly does it mean to take the name of the Lord in vain?

Thanks.

Shalom George. this is only my opinion, but when HaShem took the Children of Israel to be covenanted to Him, that was likened to a man taking a wife, and then the wife taking on the Name of the husband.  Then we have HaShem declaring that He wrote Israel a bill of divorcement (Jer 3:8), and would that not be likened to a woman who had taken the Name of her husband, and then played the harlot, taking His Name in vain?  At least that is how I view taking HaShem's Name in vain.  Blessings in The Name, ImAHebrew.
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#3
I think the commentators of yesteryear sum it up quite well -

You shall not take the name of the Lord, your God, in vain: You shall not swear in vain by the name of the Lord, your God. — [Onkelos] לַֹשָוְא -[This word appears twice in this verse.] (The second [mention of לַֹשָוְא is an expression of falsehood, as the Targum [Onkelos] renders: לְֹשִיקְרָא, as it says [in Shavuos 21a]: "What constitutes a vain oath? If one swears contrary to what is known, [for example, saying] about a stone pillar that it is [made of] gold. (The first [mention of לַֹשָוְא is an expression of vanity, as the Targum [Onkelos] renders: [לְמַגָּנָא].) This [refers to] one who swears for no reason and in vain, [for example making an oath] concerning [a pillar] of wood, [saying] that it is wood, and concerning [a pillar] of stone, [saying] that it is stone. — [from Shevuoth 29a, Mechilta]
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#4
(02-09-2021, 02:39 AM)searchinmyroots wrote: I think the commentators of yesteryear sum it up quite well -

You shall not take the name of the Lord, your God, in vain: You shall not swear in vain by the name of the Lord, your God. — [Onkelos] לַֹשָוְא -[This word appears twice in this verse.] (The second [mention of לַֹשָוְא is an expression of falsehood, as the Targum [Onkelos] renders: לְֹשִיקְרָא, as it says [in Shavuos 21a]: "What constitutes a vain oath? If one swears contrary to what is known, [for example, saying] about a stone pillar that it is [made of] gold. (The first [mention of לַֹשָוְא is an expression of vanity, as the Targum [Onkelos] renders: [לְמַגָּנָא].) This [refers to] one who swears for no reason and in vain, [for example making an oath] concerning [a pillar] of wood, [saying] that it is wood, and concerning [a pillar] of stone, [saying] that it is stone. — [from Shevuoth 29a, Mechilta]

This is what Rabbi Joseph Telushkin says about this subject in his book: “Jewish Literacy.”
“The Third Commandment also has not fared well in English. Lo tissa et shem Ha-Shem Eloheikha la-shaw is usually translated as “You shall not take the Lord Your God’s name in vain.” Many people think that this means that you have to write God as G-D, or that it is blasphemous to say words such as “goddam.” Even if these assumptions are correct, it’s still hard to figure out what makes this offsense so heinous that it’s included in the document that forbids murdering, stealing, idolatry, and adultery. However, the Hebrew Lo tissa, literally means “You shall not carry [God’s name in vain]”; in other words, don’t use God as your justification in selfish causes. The Third Commandment is the only one concerning which God says, “for the Lord God will not forgive him who carries His name in vain” (Exodus 20:6-7).

The reason now seems to be clear. When a person commits an evil act, he discredits himself. But when a religious person commits an evil act in the name of God, he or she discredits God as well. And since God relies on religious people to bring knowledge of Him into the world, He pronounces this sin unpardonable.
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#5
Thanks George!

Rabbi Joseph Telushkin is widely respected and I think his commentary is well spoken.
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#6
(02-09-2021, 01:45 PM)searchinmyroots wrote: Thanks George!

Rabbi Joseph Telushkin is widely respected and I think his commentary is well spoken.

Why do Jews write G-d instead of God?  Thanks.
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#7
I think that also by using the name of God lightly and caressly.
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#8
(02-09-2021, 04:04 PM)George wrote:
(02-09-2021, 01:45 PM)searchinmyroots wrote: Thanks George!

Rabbi Joseph Telushkin is widely respected and I think his commentary is well spoken.

Why do Jews write G-d instead of God?  Thanks.

Why?

A 3 letter word with a lot of meaning!

From my personal experience, it was because I was taught that way when I was younger.

Now reading up on it more, it seems to be associated with writing G-d's name which is not allowed by Jewish law.

The thing is, it really relates to using the Hebrew letters, not English or another translation.

So some just do it by habit and what they believe is respectful.

Like me I guess!
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#9
(02-09-2021, 07:36 PM)searchinmyroots wrote:
(02-09-2021, 04:04 PM)George wrote:
(02-09-2021, 01:45 PM)searchinmyroots wrote: Thanks George!

Rabbi Joseph Telushkin is widely respected and I think his commentary is well spoken.

Why do Jews write G-d instead of God?  Thanks.

Why?

A 3 letter word with a lot of meaning!

From my personal experience, it was because I was taught that way when I was younger.

Now reading up on it more, it seems to be associated with writing G-d's name which is not allowed by Jewish law.

The thing is, it really relates to using the Hebrew letters, not English or another translation.

So some just do it by habit and what they believe is respectful.

Like me I guess!

Thank you.
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