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Israel: Is lack of factual information why some Jews believe “Palestinian” Arab propaganda?
#21
(11-10-2021, 05:47 PM)robrecht wrote:
(10-28-2021, 03:44 AM)lan_Boskov wrote: Even that translation is distorted, given that the Phoenecians were an entirely separate group from that of the Philistines:

https://www.bible.ca/manuscripts/bible-a...1077BC.htm

How would you translate that passage from Herodotus? I'm considering whether or not Herodotus could have confused the Red Sea with the Sea around Eruthrae, whose people claimed to have come from Crete, according to Pausanias. This would also relate the Phoenicians with the sea peoples and thus also with the Philistines.

As I previously mentioned, there is no evidence Herodotus visited the area to which he (attempted) to make reference!
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#22
Robrecht wrote:...This would also relate the Phoenicians with the sea peoples and thus also with the Philistines.

We are all related, up to a certain level. To what measure the DNAs of both groups interchange may never be known, since neither group was known for practicing mummification.
Both worshiped different gods and specialized in different crafts from one another. Since Phoenecian temples were opened to persons of all ethnic groups, there could have been interactions taking place beyond religious. The Phoenecians also had an alphabet, at the time the Philistines were still using charachters as a form of documenting expression. In fact, if my memory doesen't fail me, they had established the very first alphabet:

[Image: ?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.bible.ca%2Fmanuscrip...f=1&nofb=1] [Image: ?u=https%3A%2F%2Fi.pinimg.com%2Foriginal...f=1&nofb=1]
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#23
I'm very familiar with the Phoenician alphabet from studying a little bit of Moabite, but not with Linear A, Linear B, or Cipro-Minoan script. That's an area I'm looking into now time permitting.

This article gives a good lay-person explanation of some of the paleo-genetic studies that have been done:

Quote:Intriguingly, their DNA already had a mixture of southern European and local signatures, suggesting that within a few generations the Philistines were marrying into the local population. In fact, the European signatures were not detectable at all in the individuals buried a few centuries later in the Philistine cemetery. Genetically, by then the Philistines looked like Canaanites. That fact in itself offers additional information about Philistine culture. “When they came, they did not have any kind of taboo or prohibition against marrying into other groups around them,” Master says. Nor, it would seem, did other groups categorically have that taboo about them, either. 
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#24
(11-11-2021, 12:44 PM)robrecht wrote:
Quote:...That fact in itself offers additional information about Philistine culture. “When they came, they did not have any kind of taboo or prohibition against marrying into other groups around them,” Master says. Nor, it would seem, did other groups categorically have that taboo about them, either. 
Is it surprising that a Philistine culture no longer exists? We are witnesses to what results Melt-Potting has brought to the entire region.
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#25
(11-12-2021, 07:10 AM)Alan_Boskov wrote:
(11-11-2021, 12:44 PM)robrecht wrote:
Quote:...That fact in itself offers additional information about Philistine culture. “When they came, they did not have any kind of taboo or prohibition against marrying into other groups around them,” Master says. Nor, it would seem, did other groups categorically have that taboo about them, either. 
Is it surprising that a Philistine culture no longer exists? We are witnesses to what results Melt-Potting has brought to the entire region.


It was not quite the typical sort of "melting pot" that brought the end to the Philistines, but rather a somewhat involuntary one:
- - - - Start of extract:- - - -

Quote:[...] the commercial activities of this Neo-Assyrian vassal city-state [Ekron], now under the influence of Egypt, were abruptly cut short with the invasion of Babylonians under Nebuchadnezzar in 603/4 B.C. [70]
 
[Footnote:]
[70] Gitin, “Philistia in Transition,” 179-80; for this activity against Ashkelon, see Lawrence E. Stager, “Ashkelon and the Archaeology of Destruction: Kislev 604 BCE,” Eretz-Israel, 25 (1996):61–64; idem., “The Fury of Babylon: Ashkelon and the Archaeology of Destruction,” Biblical Archaeology Review, 22/1 (1996):56–69, 76–77.
 
[Text continued:]

Quote:A massive destruction level evidenced by tumbled columns, thousands of smashed storage vessels, and collapsed upper floors of the monumental temple and throughout the site attest to the destructive force of the invading Babylonians. Other Philistine cities, such as Ashkelon, Ashdod, and Timnah, suffered similar destructions at the hand of the Babylonians. Unable to regain momentum, and with its cultural core lost, Philistine culture, too, collapsed. Its people, either dispersed or deported, were quickly assimilated into the surrounding cultures. [71]
 
[Footnote:]
[71] Gitin, “Ekron of the Philistines,” 22; Gitin, Dothan, and Naveh, “Royal Dedicatory Inscription,” 3; For another view on the process of acculturation, see B. Stone, “The Philistines and Acculturation: Culture, Change, and Ethnic Continuity in the Iron Age,” Bulletin of the American Schools of Oriental Research 298 (1995):7-32
 
Extract source:
See Page 13 of:
“New Discoveries Among the Philistines: Archaeological and Textual Considerations”
by Michael G. Hasel - Southern Adventist University:

https://www.southern.edu/archaeology/Doc...veries.pdf

- - - - End of extract - - - -
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#26
Robert wrote:...It was not quite the typical sort of "melting pot" that brought the end to the Philistines, but rather a somewhat involuntary one:...
Whether or not a Melting Pot voluntary or involuntary is would depend on if a nation's immigration policy coincides with the will of her citizens or not.
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#27
(10-17-2021, 06:08 AM)Daryavesh wrote: Robert, if I may submit the following in support of your post......

Thank you for the information and links.
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