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Take My Seat
#1
A good 2:39 minute video. It would apply to Synagogues, forums, and many places. Humiliating and embarrassing someone should never be an option.

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#2
Yikes...  I can't imagine what would possess someone to do that to someone else in a synagogue.  Just watching that made me cringe.

Good food for thought, Baruch.
Heart !לחיים

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#3
Thanks for sharing Baruch!
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#4
Rabbi Elazar of Modi'in says: " One who whitens (embarrasses) the face of another in public; has no share in the world to come. " Pirkei Avot 3.11

I always tie this in with " Do not stand by while your brothers blood is shed ". And that line on top makes it very clear, that causing the blood to flush from a face is particularly grievous.

When a person is the target of embarrassment it could literally be a life changing event. They may never take that chance again. It just seems imperative that we stand up for people who are being abused in this way. Even if we are not in position to directly confront the abuse. We can still comfort the victim. We can do something besides - stand - we can stand up in some way.
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#5
Did you notice the elderly gentleman in that video who was seated next to the embarrassed man?  He said: "That's his seat."  And when the young father (embarrassed in front of his son) got up and left, the elderly gentleman didn't make a move to go after him.  Maybe he was embarrassed, too.  But, at some point, we've all got to take a stand, even if it does make us uncomfortable to stand out.
Heart !לחיים

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#6
The writing at the end of the video is worth a more permanent place.
------------------------
The seat we have is the one that we give

No act of humiliation can be justified

One word can take away an entire generation from Torah

It is forbidden to make a newcomer get up from his seat in Shul

He who humiliates his fellow, his prayer is not answered
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#7
I feel this video and message captures beautifully a unique aspect about Judaism.  Thank you, Baruch.  While I was learning Hebrew from the Hayesod, a book containing rich stories, ancient and modern, I was also learning some of the values contained within Judaism.

One of those stories was titled, The Righteous Man and the Guest. The righteous man invites a poor guest for Shabbat. The guest was old, his hands shook and he spilled red wine all over the white tablecloth.  He was terribly embarrassed. The righteous man was quick to intervene and pull the attention to a "faulty leg" on the table, thus sparing the guest any embarrassment. What I liked best about learning Hebrew this way were the values embedded within the Hebrew language lessons.  I now see where those ethics were derived.
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#8
(02-07-2019, 10:27 PM)Channalee wrote: Did you notice the elderly gentleman in that video who was seated next to the embarrassed man?  He said: "That's his seat."  And when the young father (embarrassed in front of his son) got up and left, the elderly gentleman didn't make a move to go after him.  Maybe he was embarrassed, too.  But, at some point, we've all got to take a stand, even if it does make us uncomfortable to stand out.

I was expecting him to offer HIS seat. But he didn't. I guess because that wasn't the point.
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#9
(02-08-2019, 02:05 AM)Dena wrote:
(02-07-2019, 10:27 PM)Channalee wrote: Did you notice the elderly gentleman in that video who was seated next to the embarrassed man?  He said: "That's his seat."  And when the young father (embarrassed in front of his son) got up and left, the elderly gentleman didn't make a move to go after him.  Maybe he was embarrassed, too.  But, at some point, we've all got to take a stand, even if it does make us uncomfortable to stand out.

I was expecting him to offer HIS seat. But he didn't. I guess because that wasn't the point.

I thought of that, too.  But there was already someone sitting on his right, so I guess he couldn't shift seats without causing a commotion. 

But if he had gotten up and changed seats for the newcomer's sake, would that have embarrassed and shamed the rude guy who was demanding that the newcomer get out of his special seat? 

And, if so, would the rude guy have deserved to be embarrassed and shamed?

Oy!  What a conundrum!
Heart !לחיים

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