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Jewish beliefs about death
#1
I'm not sure which is the jewish beliefs about death.when one die what happens according to judaism?
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#2
(07-08-2020, 06:42 PM)Ismq wrote: I'm not sure which is the jewish beliefs about death.when one die what happens according to judaism?

That depends on whether you are referring to what the Hebrew bible says or what is said in Judaism.

The Hebrew bible says in Ecclesiastes 12:7 - "And the dust returns to the earth as it was, and the spirit returns to God, Who gave it." (JPT)

Judaism itself varies in opinion on what happens when you die.

Since the G-d doesn't focus on it in the Hebrew bible we (most) don't focus on it too much.

G-d focuses on how to live your life, so we do as well.
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#3
(07-08-2020, 08:27 PM)searchinmyroots wrote:
(07-08-2020, 06:42 PM)Ismq wrote: I'm not sure which is the jewish beliefs about death.when one die what happens according to judaism?

That depends on whether you are referring to what the Hebrew bible says or what is said in Judaism.

The Hebrew bible says in Ecclesiastes 12:7 - "And the dust returns to the earth as it was, and the spirit returns to God, Who gave it." (JPT)

Judaism itself varies in opinion on what happens when you die.

Since the G-d doesn't focus on it in the Hebrew bible we (most) don't focus on it too much.

G-d focuses on how to live your life, so we do as well.

It also depends upon which part of the Tanakh you read.
בקש שלום ורדפהו
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#4
(07-08-2020, 09:46 PM)RabbiO wrote:
(07-08-2020, 08:27 PM)searchinmyroots wrote:
(07-08-2020, 06:42 PM)Ismq wrote: I'm not sure which is the jewish beliefs about death.when one die what happens according to judaism?

That depends on whether you are referring to what the Hebrew bible says or what is said in Judaism.

The Hebrew bible says in Ecclesiastes 12:7 - "And the dust returns to the earth as it was, and the spirit returns to God, Who gave it." (JPT)

Judaism itself varies in opinion on what happens when you die.

Since the G-d doesn't focus on it in the Hebrew bible we (most) don't focus on it too much.

G-d focuses on how to live your life, so we do as well.

It also depends upon which part of the Tanakh you read.

All of it I hope!

Please elaborate RabbiO, thank you.
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#5
I hear a range of different beliefs, such as being buried in the grave and nothing more (until Judgement Day, I think?) or that there will be jury on all the acts and deeds committed and whether if it served Gd.

Good question. :thumbsup
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#6
(07-14-2020, 01:14 AM)CNikki wrote: I hear a range of different beliefs, such as being buried in the grave and nothing more (until Judgement Day, I think?) or that there will be jury on all the acts and deeds committed and whether if it served Gd.

Good question. :thumbsup

Hello CNikki,

Do you have sources for these?
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#7
I also thought the question was very good, and enough to interest me in reading Bart Ehrman's Heaven and Hell - A History of the Afterlife. His claim is that it was the ideas of heaven and hell that were invented,  and had been altered over the years, beginning with Gilgamesh as a beginning point and ending with Augustine.  He covers views of the afterlife in the ancient Near East, Greece and Rome, the Hebrew Bible, Second Temple Judaism, the New Testament and early Christianity.

There are verses in the Hebrew bible, early tenth century BCE, of the deeply rooted sense of finality in death. (2 Samuel 14:14 and Job 14:11-12, Psalm 104:29 and Genesis 2:7) to name a few.  There is no life after death.

He goes on to explain in one of his chapters how the Hebrew Bible is not a monolith but a wide range of views held by different authors over a period of many centuries.   How resurrection in Ancient Israel spoke more to the entire nation and not that of the individual. That was to come later where the writings leaned towards the rise of apocalyptic thinking.
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#8
I think there is a difference in what happens to your physical body as compared to your soul.

Of course we really don't know what a soul is so that is up for debate.
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#9
Orthodox Judaism has teachings on the soul returning to shamym and sometimes having to go through a purification process in gehenom, which involves suffering. There are teachings of a heavenly court and having to talk through every mitzvah and sin in your life, and the soul feels shame for every sin.

There are also teachings of reincarnation which I have mixed feelings about but I'm still learning. They say that the same 3 million souls from Sinai return over and over to purify and refine themselves through many lives and sometimes the suffering in this life is measure for measure, punishment for sins in a previous life.
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