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Genesis 1
#11
(02-20-2020, 10:54 AM)Jason wrote: That certainly doesn't come from a plain reading of the Torah text. Just saying.

Did the author of the article get this right?

Two Accounts of Creation
When we examine these two verses, the most prominent difference between them is the name used for God. The first chapter uses the name Elokim - a name that corresponds to the Divine attribute of Justice (Midat Ha-Din). This aspect of creation is also called Gevurah (Strength), as the ability to meet the strict standards of unmitigated justice provides strength and legitimacy. If we can measure up to the attribute of Divine justice, we deserve to live.
The second chapter uses a combination of two names for the Creator: Hashem Elokim. The Torah precedes the name Elokim with the Tetragrammaton. This ineffable Divine name signifies the Divine trait of Mercy (Rachamim). It indicates that the world did not deserve to exist on the basis of its own merits. Creation of the universe required that the attribute of Justice be tempered with a measure of Mercy.

Do you teach Hebrew?
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#12
(02-20-2020, 06:06 PM)George wrote:
(02-20-2020, 10:54 AM)Jason wrote: That certainly doesn't come from a plain reading of the Torah text. Just saying.

Did the author of the article get this right?

Two Accounts of Creation
When we examine these two verses, the most prominent difference between them is the name used for God. The first chapter uses the name Elokim - a name that corresponds to the Divine attribute of Justice (Midat Ha-Din). This aspect of creation is also called Gevurah (Strength), as the ability to meet the strict standards of unmitigated justice provides strength and legitimacy. If we can measure up to the attribute of Divine justice, we deserve to live.
The second chapter uses a combination of two names for the Creator: Hashem Elokim. The Torah precedes the name Elokim with the Tetragrammaton. This ineffable Divine name signifies the Divine trait of Mercy (Rachamim). It indicates that the world did not deserve to exist on the basis of its own merits. Creation of the universe required that the attribute of Justice be tempered with a measure of Mercy.

Do you teach Hebrew?
Yes, Jason teaches Hebrew.

There are a number of important distinctions between the two different stories in Genesis, how G-d is referred to is one of them. The first chapter uses Elohim. (Writing and saying Elokim is a common Orthodox practice when saying the name outside of prayer or scripture reading.) Chapter 2 refers to G-d as YHWH Elohim. YHWH is, of course, the tetragrammaton. The normative in prayer and in chanting Torah or Haftarah is to substitute Adonai for YHWH. (Again, common Orthodox practice is to substitute Hashem [The Name] or Adoshem for Adonai in every day speech or writing.)

The interpretation given is pretty standard traditional interpretation.
בקש שלום ורדפהו
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#13
Is there any reason grammatically that בְּרֵאשִׁית, beresheet, could not translate in Genesis 1:1 as an adverb instead of the standard noun translation for beginning?

G-d initially created...
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#14
(02-20-2020, 06:06 PM)George wrote:
(02-20-2020, 10:54 AM)Jason wrote: That certainly doesn't come from a plain reading of the Torah text. Just saying.

Do you teach Hebrew?

You can view my latest classes online at http://youtube.thehebrewcafe.com. Smile
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#15
(02-20-2020, 11:17 PM)Dana wrote: Is there any reason grammatically that בְּרֵאשִׁית, beresheet, could not translate in Genesis 1:1 as an adverb instead of the standard noun translation for beginning?

G-d initially created...

I think it modifies the verb of the phrase.

בְּרֵאשִׁית בְּרֹא אֱלֹהִים אֵת הַשָּׁמַ֫יִם וְאֵת הָאָ֫רֶץ וְהָאָ֫רֶץ הָֽיְתָה תֹּ֫הוּ וָבֹ֫הוּ וְכוּ׳

That is, I understand בְּרֹא instead of בָּרָא. This is an infinitive construct, joining “creating” to “God.” “God’s creating...” I tied the first verse to the second:

In the beginning of God’s creating the sky and the earth, the earth was tóhu va-vóvu etc..

Ultimately, it’s tied to the next verse, which is the first verse with any action in it. “And God said...” Verse 2 might be considered background information (notice the ve-x qatal structure), and we have:

When God began creating the sky and the earth—while the earth was tóhu va-vóhu etc.—God said, “Let there be light.”

In other words, the “initial” act here was a speech act. Everything before that was setup.
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#16
(02-21-2020, 03:16 AM)Jason wrote:
(02-20-2020, 06:06 PM)George wrote:
(02-20-2020, 10:54 AM)Jason wrote: That certainly doesn't come from a plain reading of the Torah text. Just saying.

Do you teach Hebrew?

You can view my latest classes online at http://youtube.thehebrewcafe.com. Smile

I know you teach Greek, but wanted to make sure you also teach Hebrew. Smile
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#17
(02-21-2020, 03:25 AM)Jason wrote:
(02-20-2020, 11:17 PM)Dana wrote: Is there any reason grammatically that בְּרֵאשִׁית, beresheet, could not translate in Genesis 1:1 as an adverb instead of the standard noun translation for beginning?

G-d initially created...

I think it modifies the verb of the phrase.

בְּרֵאשִׁית בְּרֹא אֱלֹהִים אֵת הַשָּׁמַ֫יִם וְאֵת הָאָ֫רֶץ וְהָאָ֫רֶץ הָֽיְתָה תֹּ֫הוּ וָבֹ֫הוּ וְכוּ׳

That is, I understand בְּרֹא instead of בָּרָא. This is an infinitive construct, joining “creating” to “God.” “God’s creating...” I tied the first verse to the second:

In the beginning of God’s creating the sky and the earth, the earth was tóhu va-vóvu etc..

Ultimately, it’s tied to the next verse, which is the first verse with any action in it. “And God said...” Verse 2 might be considered background information (notice the ve-x qatal structure), and we have:

When God began creating the sky and the earth—while the earth was tóhu va-vóhu etc.—God said, “Let there be light.”

In other words, the “initial” act here was a speech act. Everything before that was setup.

I like the translation! It took me some time to understand because I have no recollection of working through the infinitive construct, and I was attempting to apply the rules that construct chains do not allow interruptions of the unit other than definite articles or directional endings. The question of how a participle verbal noun such as (creating) can fit was confusing me.  If I identified the word correctly.

I found it in Chapter 16 of the LBH by Karl V. Kutz and Rebecca Josberger.

Thank you.
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#18
(02-19-2020, 07:48 PM)RabbiO wrote: Perhaps the pastor is familiar with this midrash from בראשית רבה  -

"Rabbi Judah son of Rabbi Simon said: “Let there be evening” is not written here (talking about the Torah), but “And there was evening” ; hence we know that a time-order existed before this (talking about our current universe). ...

My own personal understanding of this (but presumably not original to me) is that the poetic image in the mind of the author(s) of Genesis 1 might have been that of dawn. God created light and then God separated light from darkness. Is that not how every day begins? Why not also the first day? First with a little bit of light on the horizon, and then the light becomes greater and greater until finally the darkness is completely dispelled and relegated to a separate time of day. The day begins in darkness, as did all of creation (חֹשֶׁךְ). This is not creation out of nothing, but creation out of chaos and darkness. God did not need to create the evening, to say, "Let there be Evening." It was already there before he first created light and then separated it from the primordial darkness.
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